O Bone (Chuck) Roast: A Year of Beef

Welcome! Today is the first day of our Year of Beef series.

Before we get into the actual cooking beef part, I want to make a few things clear.

  1. I am not completely inept when it comes to cooking; however, I am far from a professional. I don’t own any fancy cooking devices, know what a balsamic-reduction is, or know how to fold my linen napkins into little origami swans. So if you’re reading along thinking to yourself “I don’t know if I can do that,” the answer is “Yes! Yes you can!”
  2. Very few of the recipes I use this year will actually be of my own creation. I plan on using a few of my favorites, things I’ve found, and recipes that you’ve submitted! So when I say “next week I’m going to be using a Rib Steak,” feel free to send me your best Rib Steak recipes! You can fill out the contact form on our website, email us (info(at)idahocattlewomen(dot)org), or send us a Facebook® message!
  3. We wholeheartedly welcome your feedback!! That being said, we want to keep this a positive place. The point of this series is to help women feel more comfortable when cooking beef, and give new ideas to those who already do. Feel free to leave tips or tricks that you have found helpful when cooking beef or ask any questions you have about cooking beef!

Moooooooooooo-ving on…let’s get cooking!!!

The roast cooked today is an O Bone, named because of the small, circular bone within the cut. This is a type of bone-in Chuck Roast. A Seven-Bone Roast or other bone-in chuck roast will cook the same. meatdiagram

As you can see, Chuck cuts (highlighted in yellow) come from the high shoulder area. It’s naturally a tougher cut of meat so cooking it low and slow yields a tender texture and delicious taste!

If you’re someone who is going to be looking for one of these bad boys in a grocery store, you’ll find them to be moderately priced—so buy away!

The recipe I’m using came from The Wicked Noodle and is one I will definitely be using again!


2-3 tablespoons vegetable or canola oil

4 pound Chuck Roast

1 medium to large yellow onion, chopped

1/3 cup balsamic vinegar

2-3 tablespoons Dijon mustard

5 sprigs fresh thyme

2 cups reduced-sodium beef broth

2 bunches small carrots

1 pound baby potatoes, white or red

Salt & freshly ground black pepper

**My additions/substitutions: Neither of my local grocery stores carried fresh thyme, so I chose to forego that ingredient. I like rubbing meat in a product called “Spade L Ranch Beef Marinade and Seasoning,” and thought this would be a good opportunity to do so (which I will explain about below). I also had a couple sweet potatoes that I wanted to get used up, so I substituted those for the 1 pound of baby potatoes.


  1. Preheat oven to 300F.
  2. Heat oil in a large dutch oven over high heat. Season roast well with salt and pepper, add to pan and brown well on all sides (a few minutes per side). Remove roast and set aside.
  3. Add chopped onion to drippings in pot and reduce heat to medium. Sauté onions until soft, about 5 minutes. Add balsamic vinegar, increase heat to medium-high and boil until reduced and slightly syrupy, about 4-5 minutes. Stir in Dijon.
  4. Set roast on top of onions in pot. Pour in 2 cups of beef broth and add thyme sprigs. Cover and place in over for 2 ½ -3 hours, or until very tender.
  5. Add carrots and potatoes to pot and return to oven. Continue cooking until carrots and potatoes are tender, somewhere between 30 and 60 minutes.
Isn’t a rubbed roast just beautiful?!

Isn’t a rubbed roast just beautiful?!

Spade L Ranch Beef Marinade and Seasoning is one of my favorite products, so I decided to put it to good use. Although the original recipe doesn’t call for adding a rub, I chose to rub my roast the night before, and let it sit overnight in all that delicious flavor.

Rubbing something like this is super simple…I added a small amount of water to a shallow baking dish, got all sides of the roast wet, and then went to town rubbing Spade L anywhere it would stick. 


Fun Fact: My house and I both survived the browning process, intact!

I’m not going to lie, the browning process made me real nervous. I remember one time when I was younger my mom was making a friend and I homemade finger steaks, and accidently had a small grease fire. Ever since I’ve been leery of beef and oil together….so you can only imagine what went through my head the moment I put my roast in the pan. “Here I’ve promised everyone that I wouldn’t burn my house down, and chances are it’s gonna happen right now!”

After the browning process, I continued on with adding the chopped onions in and probably sautéed them for a good 5-6 minutes. Then I boiled down the balsamic vinegar and added in the Dijon. It was at this point where I wondered if I had picked the right recipe. Hot onions, boiling vinegar, and spicy Dijon–my eyes started watering with all the fumes and there was a small part of me that wondered if I still had time to turn back.

Remember when I told you that I didn't own any fancy cooking devices? Case in point...I borrowed this Le Creuset dutch oven from my Mom, and it was the perfect size!After everything was browned, sautéed, dijoned,and brothed it was finally ready to go in the oven! I love this part because it gave me time to get a few things done around the house, which included washing all the dishes I used! I’m the kind of person who loves sitting down to a meal with an already-clean kitchen!

At the 2.5 hour mark, I took the roast out, and added the carrots and potatoes. I cut both up pretty thin, because I wanted them to come out really tender. I kept the roast in the oven for another hour before pulling it out and slicing it up!

O Bone Roast


This, my friends, is O Bone Roast heaven! The guys had to unexpectedly run to Twin Falls the same day I made this, so Justin didn’t come home for lunch. Since I didn’t want something this fresh-out-of-the-oven to go to waste, I called my Mom and had her come over for lunch. She gave it two thumbs up, and told me she wants to use this recipe on her own cut of Rafter T Ranch O Bone!

Next week I’ll be cooking up a Rib Steak, so if you have any good recipes be sure to send them my way!

Categories: Beef, Cattle, Idaho Cattlewomen, Ranch Life, Recipes