Tag: agriculture

Agriculture Links

Have you checked out our links page? We’ve included some great resources for finding out more about how cattle are raised, the health benefits and nutritional aspects of beef, new recipes for preparing beef and some fun facts about the agriculture industry.

We know consumers have a lot of questions these days about where their food comes from. We cattlewomen are still learning and also have questions about agriculture. Bottomline is as agriculturists, we have a strong tie to the land and animals in our care. Providing safe and nutritious food is our number one priority. We’re feeding our families too! Please know if you have any questions about your food or how it’s produced, you can reach out and ask. We’d love to hear from you!


Check out these other websites for more information on cattle and beef.

Explorebeef Explore Beef ~ www.explorebeef.org

Beef For Dinner Logo Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. ~ www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com

Facts About Beef logo Facts About BEEF ~ www.factsaboutbeef.com



Animal Smart ~ www.animalsmart.org


Black ICA Logo2 Idaho Cattle Association ~ www.idahocattle.org

Idaho Beef Council Logo JPG Idaho Beef Council ~ www.idbeef.org

Beef Counts Logo-final--1-12-10 Beef Counts ~ www.beefcounts.org


Some Blogs We Like

Beef Matters

The Idaho Rancher’s Wife

Feedyard Foodie

Mom at the Meat Counter

Categories: Beef, Blogging, Cattle

Christmas in the Country Gift Reveal

Hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season and is excited for the new year ahead! It always brings a sense of renewal and possibilities. A new blog series Jessie introduced Wednesday is a Year’s Worth of Beef, which we’re excited to start sharing with you. We hope you keep checking back each week to read as she’s cooking her way through a freezer of beef.

Before we get too far into the year, I wanted to recap a fun gift exchange I participated in with citc15fellow bloggers and ag enthusiasts called Christmas in the Country. I was invited to join by a new friend I made when I attended a conference last spring, Laurie Link. She and her family raise crops and cattle in Missouri, and she blogs at CountryLinked. (I love her blog name!) #CITC is set up like a Secret Santa where the hosts (who did a ton of behind-the-scenes work to get this going) match people up, participants get to know their matches “secretly,” then send them a gift. This week we’re all “linking up” to share more about our gifts and the new friends we’ve made through the secret exchange.

We were gone during the holidays, so I was excited when we returned to find the cutest red and white package waiting for me! So excited, in fact, I totally forgot to take a photo! Anyway, Heather Maude of South Dakota had my name.

She is a fellow cattle rancher, freelance writer and photographer like me, so I love that we also share that connection. She also happens to be a relative of another ag communicator I’ve known since my college days. Such a small world! Heather blogs her photography and agriculture stories at Double H Photography.

I loved the thoughtful gifts she put together for me.

Christmas in the Country Gift Exchange

As we both share a love of livestock photography, I really appreciated the notecards and calendar with her photographs. I also needed a 2016 calendar so this is my favorite treat she included.

She learned I was a coffee drinker and the travel mug is great for taking a hot cup with me on-the-go!

Heather also included an angel cookie cutter because she thought it was cute, and I couldn’t agree more. My kids love baking and decorating sugar cookies, so this was a fun treat we can all enjoy.

The lip balm and ear warmer are much appreciated to combat the cold, dry air we experience during our Idaho winters.

Another gift was a Jesus Calling devotional. Great minds think alike as a dear friend of mine gave one to me for my birthday a few months ago. It really is a wonderful devotional and I’m going to be able to bless someone else by passing it on to them!

The last treat at the bottom of the box was a bag of Christmas M&M’s. One of my favorite IMG_1853__WEBcookie recipes are these M&M Cookies, so the chocolate candies were put to good use in a sweet treat we also shared with friends. You can find the recipe below.

Thank you Heather for these thoughtful gifts!

I had a lot of fun participating this year, as I put together a gift box for Jamie Rhoades at This Uncharted Rhoade. You can learn more about those on her blog. I’ll also have an upcoming post with more details about the projects I made for her!

I’m so glad I participated this year! It is a fun way to bring some Christmas cheer to someone, as well as learn more about others in our industry. You may want to think about joining in the fun next year! You can check out all the other participants at this LinkUp!

M&M Cookies
1/2 cup softened butter
1 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup peanut butter
2 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla
1 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 cups flour
2 cups oatmeal
1 package M&Ms (I use colors available for each of the holidays)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spoon flour into measuring cup then level off. Sift together with  other dry ingredients in a bowl and set aside. In another bowl, cream butter and sugar until fluffy. Add peanut butter, eggs one at a time, and vanilla. Add the dry ingredients until combined. Drop by spoonfuls onto baking sheet. (I like to use parchment paper or a silicon baking sheet.) Bake for 8-10 minutes.


Categories: Blogging, Idaho Cattlewomen, Lifestyle

30 Days of Women in Ag: Recap

Wow! It’s December 2015! How have we reached the end of the year already?! We just completed our first Women in Ag Blog Series and want to say thanks to all who read, commented, shared and participated. We are grateful for the support! For every woman featured, there are a couple hundred more that are also contributing in unique and different ways to help bring food and fiber to the rest of us. We look forward to sharing more stories of Women in Ag in the months to come. For now, we hope you will continue following us as we share the story of agriculture from Idaho Cattlewomen. Following is a collection of links to recap our month.

Day 1: Women in Ag: Idaho CattleWomen Chair, Robin Lufkin

Day 2: Women in Ag: Idaho Agriculture Director, Celia Gould

Day 3: Women in Ag: UI Research Technician, Megan Satterwhite

Day 4: Women in Ag: Weiser Cattlewoman, Julie Kerner

Day 5: Women in Ag: Camas Prairie Cowgirl, Diana Graning

Day 6: Women in Ag: Agriculture Devotee, Christie Prescott

Day 7: Women in Ag: ICA Board Member, Dawn Anderson

Day 8: Women in Ag: Simplot Land Manager, Darcy Helmick

Day 9: Women in Ag: Rangeland Resource Commission Director, Gretchen Hyde

Day 10: Women in Ag: Idaho Purebred Breeder, Maureen Mai

Day 11: Women in Ag: Trade Specialist, Leah Clark 

Day 12: Women in Ag: Social Media Savvy Cowgirl, Chyenne Smith

Day 13: Women in Ag: Natural Resources Policy Advisor, Karen Williams

Day 14: Women in Ag: Range Management Specialist, Brooke Jacobson

Day 15: Women in Ag: Cowboy Girl, Jayme Thompson

Day 16: Women in Ag: All-Around Ranch Wife, Trish Dowton

Day 17: Women in Ag: Small Town Superwoman, Jodie Mink

Day 18: Women in Ag: Livestock Marketing Communicator, Kim Holt

Day 19: Women in Ag: All-Around Cattleman, Jessie Jarvis

Day 20: Women in Ag: Idaho Cattle Association President, Laurie Lickley

Day 21: Women in Ag: County Extension Agent, Sarah Baker

Day 22: Women in Ag: Corporate Marketing Specialist, Alethea Prewett

Day 23: Women in Ag: ICA Membership and Productions Manager, Dawn Schooley

Day 24: Women in Ag: Top Hand, Kara Kraich Smith

Day 25: Women in Ag: Animal Health Territory Manager, Carmen Stevens

Day 26: Women in Ag: Fourth Generation Rancher, Sarah Helmick

Day 27: Women in Ag: Ag Communications Professional, Maggie Malson

Day 28: Women in Ag: Rural-Loving Ranch Wife, Tay Brackett

Day 29: Women in Ag: Cattle Industry Champion, Ramona Karas

Day 30: Women in Ag: Rancher and Everyday Agvocate, Linda Rider

Please feel free to continue sharing these stories, and if you have any comments or questions about future Women in Ag posts, please contact us at info@idahocattlewomen.org.



Categories: Beef, Blogging, Cattle, Idaho Cattlewomen

Giving Tuesday

Your inbox and mailbox may have already been flooded with coupons for great deals and shopping on Black Friday, Small Business Saturday or Cyber Monday, but today we wanted to highlight #GivingTuesday, a one-day global event for charitable giving. After all this is the season of giving and we just celebrated giving thanks for all our many blessings.

The beef community came together in 2010 to create a rancher-led initiative to provide a more consistent supply of protein to those in need through The Idaho Foodbank. Partners include the Idaho Cattle Association, Idaho CattleWomen Council, Agri Beef Co., and the Idaho Beef Council. Through the program, ranchers can donate an animal to be auctioned off at participating auction yards around the state and the proceeds are used to purchase ground beef or roasts for the Foodbank. In addition, anyone can make a cash donation to the program, which will be used to purchase beef. Agri Beef Co., matches every donation, so every dollar donated goes farther. Since it started, Beef Counts has distributed more than 650,000 servings of beef—a complete, nutrient-dense source of protein, iron, zinc and B vitamins.

To learn more about the program, visit Beef Counts or The Idaho Foodbank.

You can Donate securely online today. Please indicate you want your donation to go to Beef Counts in the comment section of the online donation form.

You can also fill out and mail in this form. Click image to link to printable pdf.

Categories: Beef, Idaho Cattlewomen

Women in Ag: Rancher and Everyday Agvocate, Linda Rider

Linda Rider and her husband, Robert, live on a ranch 10 miles east of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, and have been married 42 years. They have three grown daughters, two graduated from the University of Idaho with degrees in Ag Science and one graduated from Boise State University, and they are married. The oldest, Sharla, lives in the area and is the 4-H Program Coordinator for Kootenai County. She has a son, Jay who is 13 years old. Middle daughter, Cece, lives on the ranch with her two little boys and firefighter husband. She is often her Dad’s helper while Linda enjoys “Grandma duties.” Their youngest daughter, Cassy, lives in Boise and is a graphic designer. Linda is serving as a board member of the Idaho Cattle Association, representing North Idaho.

Linda shares her love of ag and her ranching lifestyle with visitors to her ranch.

Linda shares her love of ag and her ranching lifestyle with visitors to her ranch.

How are you involved in agriculture and/or beef industry today? My husband operates the family ranch where we run a small herd of Red Angus cattle, manage the timber grounds, and put up some grass hay. In 1986, we also started a trail ride business, taking tourists and others on horseback rides through our “horse pasture” and sharing our lifestyle with them for a brief time. This business has grown during the years to include multiple activities such as rides during the day, evening dinner rides, children’s birthday parties, activities for young and/or multiple generational families, interactive farm tours for children, bus tours, family reunions and weddings. The best part of the business is getting to visit with the folks while they are here. Helping them enjoy themselves and taking the opportunities to share about agriculture and the food and products that farmers and ranchers produce. Hopefully they take away an agriculture knowledge base that they will use when they read/hear about issues and perhaps filter out some of the biased flavorings against agriculture and users of the natural resources. “Agritourism” is now a buzzword within our industry, but it is what we have been doing for 30 years.

How has your life been shaped by agriculture and/or beef industry? I grew up in the area close to where I still live. As I grew up we had many folks with 40-80 acre type farms who ran small herds of cattle as part of their livelihoods. My father was the local cow trader who visited up and down the area, buying a cow or two here, perhaps trading it to someone else up the valley, putting it into our herd or taking it to the sale yard. I was an only child and my Dad’s boy, so I traveled a lot with him, chased cows, sorted cows, hayed, etc., from the time I was very small. I married Rob, who’s family lived about 15 miles away, and had land and some cattle as well. Soon afterwards Rob and I began running a combined herd of his family’s cattle and some out of my Dad’s herd. We still run on his family’s place and an adjoining Forest Service allotment. We have raised three daughters who are good “hands.”   When I help chase cows now, I usually have “Grandma” duties and help our grandkids participate.

Who inspires you or serves as a mentor? Those folks that I know who are willing to give

Winter trail rides through timber and pasture for ranch guests.

Winter trail rides through timber and pasture for ranch guests.

time and energy to serve on boards, committees and/or speak up for agriculture.

How do you provide encouragement to others?
I’d like to think that by setting a good example others will follow.

If given the chance, what message about agriculture or the beef industry would you share with a large group of people? I would like to tell them that ranchers produce a quality, healthy food product while being good stewards of the natural resources. I would like them to put the romantic image of the cowboy to the side and understand that we are family businesses run by educated people who use computers, science and common sense as tools to meet each day’s challenges. We deal with lots of rules and regulations, often established by non-ag interests, and are challenged by the weather, but keep on going. I would want people to see we are real and sincere, and provide a valuable service to our land and country.

What are you most thankful for? Freedom. The freedom to pick a lifestyle and occupation that enables us to work as a family unit and work on our own timeline. To live a lifestyle where we can enjoy a grand view of nature every day, whether it is from our kitchen window or the back of a horse. While some days are hard, sad or miserable, they are balanced by the richness of an eagle soaring, elk on the hillside or baby calves playing in the meadow and sharing it with the next generations.

What is you favorite meal to cook yourself or for others? It is always hard to beat a good steak, baked potato, homemade bread, salad and a Dutch oven dessert—a meal we cook for our many dinner ride guests all summer long. As a standby I often cook a “5-hour Beef Stew” that was an Idaho Beef cook-off recipe from the 1980s.

A beautiful view from this North Idaho cattle ranch.

A beautiful view from this North Idaho cattle ranch.

What is the first thing you do when you walk into a grocery store? Marvel at all the junk that people are willing to buy instead of buying basic, healthy ingredients and actually cooking.

What is your favorite childhood memory? All the time I got to spend with my Dad chasing cows, riding in the truck hauling cows, and just being his helper. He always saw the good side of people and the bright side of a bad situation.

Favorite store to shop in? My checkbook book would say that most of my “shopping” is done at Costco and the locally owned Super 1 grocery store. Otherwise I like to shop at thrift stores to look for “treasures.”

You can contact Linda at info@riderranch.com!

Categories: Beef, Blogging, Cattle, Idaho Cattlewomen, Ranch Life