Tag: cattlewoman

Women in Ag: Trade Specialist, Leah Clark

Leah Clark is a Trade Specialist for the Idaho State Department of Agriculture (ISDA), and is also the Manager of the Idaho Preferred® Program. She has been with ISDA since 2004. Leah serves on the Idaho Agriculture in the Classroom Advisory Board and the Leadership Idaho Agriculture Board of Trustees. Prior to joining the Idaho State Department of Agriculture, Leah served as the Executive Director of the Idaho Beef Council for 15 years. Leah has two daughters, Alyssa and Lauren.

How are you involved in agriculture and/or the beef industry today? I currently manage the Idaho Preferred program at the Idaho State Department of Agriculture. Idaho Preferred® is a program to identify and promote Idaho food and agriculture products in Idaho. I also manage my daughter’s small registered Angus herd while she is away attending Oklahoma State University.

IdahoPreferredProgram

Leah promotes food grown and produced in Idaho through the Idaho Preferred® program.

How has your life been shaped by agriculture? My entire career has been devoted to agriculture. My first job at age 13 was cooking for wheat harvest crew before being promoted to truck and then combine driver. I was the first female to serve as president of my FFA chapter and I went on to get a Bachelors and a Master’s Degree in Agriculture. My first professional career was as an Extension 4-H Agent in a rural county in Arizona. After completing my Master’s Degree at Oklahoma State University, I was hired by the Idaho Beef Council as Executive Director where I served for 15 years before moving to the Idaho State Department of Agriculture to manage the Idaho Preferred® program. The highlight of my career was receiving the Governor’s Award for Excellence in Agriculture for Marketing Innovation in 2012.

Who inspires you or serves as a mentor? Inez Jaca, a cattle producer from Reynolds Creek has always inspired me. Her commitment to the beef industry is unparalleled.

How do you provide encouragement to others? Currently several young women work within the Marketing Division of the Idaho State Department of Agriculture. I encourage them by listening to their ideas and concerns, and providing a sounding board when they are frustrated. I provide suggestions when asked and applaud their efforts with positive verbal recognition directly to them and to their supervisor.

Anguscows

Leah and daughter, Lauren, share a love of Angus cattle. Lauren’s herd grazes on the family’s front pasture.

If given the chance, what message about agriculture or the beef industry would you share with a large group of people? Farmers and ranchers are committed to providing safe and affordable food—not only for Americans but for consumers around the world. U.S. consumers must realize that American farmers are crucial to feeding the world and we need to make sure that they (farmers) are able to use all of the current and future technologies available to feed a fast growing world population.

What are you most thankful for? My two daughters, who were very patient with my full time work schedule and frequent travel, and who have grown up to be very successful young women in their chosen fields.

What is your favorite meal to cook yourself or for others?My favorite meal to prepare for myself is a Caprese Salad featuring fresh tomatoes and basil from my garden and fresh Idaho mozzarella. For guests I love preparing the perfect prime rib at the holidays.

What are your guilty pleasures in life? Wine and dark chocolate

What are some of your favorite pastimes and/or hobbies? Hobbies include gardening, reading, pie baking and skiing (both water and snow).

Favorite place to visit? Wherever my girls reside—currently Seattle and Stillwater, Okla.

Find out more at Idaho Preferred!

Categories: Beef, Blogging, Idaho Cattlewomen

Women in Ag: Agriculture Devotee, Christie Prescott

Idaho is home to two Camas Prairies, and we’re lucky enough to be able to feature a cowgirl from each one! Yesterday you read a profile on Diana Graning, and today you can read one on Christie Prescott. Christie was born and raised on a ranch outside of Fairfield, Idaho. Her husband, Wyatt, serves as the Executive Vice President of the Idaho Cattle Association. She and Wyatt have a son, Gus, and are expecting a little girl at the end of this month!

How are you involved in agriculture and/or the beef industry today? My involvement in Agriculture really starts at my day job as outreach coordinator for the Idaho Grain Producers Association. When I’m not in the office my husband and I are building our own beef cattle operation. Currently, we primarily grow calves and place them as feeder cattle in a custom feedlot. We also do whatever the market presents as an opportunity when it does, like feeding feeder cows and growing our cow-calf numbers.

How has your life been shaped by agriculture? I grew in agriculture. I still have dreams that I’m back on the ranch I grew up on. I hope that my children will be as fortunate as I was and get to grow up the same way. I look forward to instilling the passion for cattle in our children. Being surrounded by the beautiful Idaho landscape, working the land and learning to be responsible through agriculture is the best way to grow up.

Christie

Who inspires you or serves as a mentor? My grandpa, Al Bauscher, has always been an inspiration to me. He was a WWII veteran that came home to Fairfield and kept up the family cattle business. He inspired me because he was tough as nails and always on time. I keep a picture of the two of us together, at my desk as a constant reminder.

How do you provide encouragement to others? I provide encouragement to others by providing valid feedback and being supportive. I’m a realist that likes to get things done. I think a fresh perspective is always good and try to support the best way to do any given thing.

If given the chance, what message about agriculture or the beef industry would you share with a large group of people? I’d like to let people know that if they like to eat they should be supportive of agriculture and agricultural practices. I think there is a major gap in people knowing where their food comes from. Many don’t understand what goes into food production. I’d like them to understand that farmers and ranchers are where what on their plate starts and that these people care the most about their animals and land.

What are you most thankful for? I’m most thankful for my family and our health. I’ve come to realize through losing my parents that it’s the most important thing.

What is your favorite meal to cook yourself or for others? Bolognese sauce and spaghetti are always a go-to favorite.

 

What is the first thing you do when you walk into a grocery store? I try and shop the perimeter of a grocery store. I load up on fresh produce followed by meats, cheeses and dairy. I try and avoid highly processed aisle foods.

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What are some of your favorite pastimes and/or hobbies? Trail running and boot camp work outs, reading, watching football, canning and cooking.

What are three little known facts about you? 1) I was a BLM firefighter for six fire seasons. 2) I am a Lord of the Rings nerd. 3) I’m actually shy and have to work hard at being outgoing.

Be sure to keep up with Christie on Instagram and Facebook!

Day 5: Women in Ag: Diana Graning
Day 4: Women in Ag: Julie Kerner
Day 3: Women in Ag: Megan Satterwhite
Day 2: Women in Ag: Celia Gould
Day 1: Women in Ag: Robin Lufkin

Categories: Beef, Blogging, Cattle, Idaho Cattlewomen, Lifestyle

Women in Ag: Camas Prairie Cowgirl, Diana Graning

Diana Graning was raised on northcentral Idaho’s Camas Prairie. A graduate of the University of Idaho, Diana majored in Animal Science Production, putting her degree to work as a Feed Consultant for a local Ag Co-Op. Recently Diana made the decision to leave her job, so she could focus on her family and their cows. Diana and her husband, Cody, have a little girl named Mesa Rose, and are expecting another little girl arriving at the end of January!

How are you involved in agriculture today? My family and I ranch, as well as operate our own custom spraying and fertilizer business, specifically for crop fields.

How has your life been shaped by agriculture? My life has been shaped positively by agriculture in the way of learning core life values such as work ethic, treating others and animals fairly and the value of a dollar.

Who inspires you or serves as a mentor? I’m inspired by all women in agriculture!

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Photo Credit: Jestine Hensley

How do you provide encouragement to others? I love sending cards in the mail, or utilizing social media to share a quick message to someone I’m thinking about.

If given the chance, what message about agriculture or the beef industry would you share with a large group of people? I would most like to share the message that as rancher, we treat our animals the very best we can, not only because of financial impact, but because care for all ranch/farm animals. There is so much misconstrued information about livestock coming from “factories” i.e. “Factory farms.” This is nothing even remotely similar between a farm/ranch and a factory. I think this is one of the common myths that bothers me the most.

What are you most thankful for? I am very thankful that I was born and raised in agriculture! I’m even more thankful for the opportunity to continue living this lifestyle and to be able to raise my children the same way I was brought up!

What is your favorite meal to cook yourself or for others? Anyone in my house knows that answer would be spaghetti! It’s easy to make, especially in large quantities, and we never seem to get tired of it.

What are a few of your guilty pleasures? Although I don’t get to watch a lot of TV, I have to say when given the choice to something completely on my own time, especially if its dark outside I really enjoy a good TV show series or a movie. Some of my favorites are Big Bang Theory, Brady Bunch and movies are of course any horse show (Seabiscuit, Secretariat…love them all), Ms. Congeniality or most all Sandra Bullock movies.

Photo Credit: Jestine Hensley

Photo Credit: Jestine Hensley

What’s your favorite store to shop in? Any farm/ranch store that has TACK! I also enjoy Old Navy for clothes shopping for the family. It’s inexpensive, offers simple styles, and good quality.

What’s the first thing you do when to get to the grocery store? Well first thing is to grab a cart and check my list if I didn’t leave it at home or in the pickup. My favorite isle is the laundry soap isle. It just smells SO good!

Be sure to stay in touch with Diana on Facebook!

Day 4: Women in Ag: Julie Kerner
Day 3: Women in Ag: Megan Satterwhite
Day 2: Women in Ag: Celia Gould
Day 1: Women in Ag: Robin Lufkin

Categories: Blogging, Idaho Cattlewomen, Lifestyle, Ranch Life

Women in Ag: Weiser Cattlewoman, Julie Kerner

Julie and her family own a cow-calf, yearling operation and custom feedlot in southwest Idaho. She and her husband were raised on livestock ranches and their industry roots run deep. Their children have been very active and involved in the ranch and feedlot, and are developing their own herds of quality cattle. Julie enjoys read and playing the organ at church.

How are you involved in agriculture today? I am a partner with my husband, Bruce, in our family operation, Kerner Cattle Company. Day-to-day tasks include bookwork, riding pens and cattle care, phone calls and more phone calls. It also involves daily discussions about cattle and our family. Our lives center on faith, family and the land and cattle we care for. In our community, we strive to show our neighbors what “good stewards” are, in the tangible sense. We work with the 4-H & FFA groups during weigh-in, offering our scales and chute so the kid’s animals are vaccinated and tagged correctly. We stay active in our Weiser River Cattle Association, working on local and state issues. We also work on Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) principals with our family and employees.

How has your life been shaped by agriculture? One of my earliest memories is sitting on the back of a Hereford bull in a stall of my family’s barn. Born and raised on a registered Hereford ranch, I was always in the barn with my Dad and Granddad. I loved being around cattle. I became active in the Jr. Hereford Association, which allowed me to see cattle across the nation and fuel my passion to be involved in the cattle industry at a young age. With a degree in Animal Science from the University of Idaho, I continued working in the livestock and allied industries. As our family and Kerner Cattle Company grew, I was able to become a full time “ranch wife.” This has allowed Bruce & I to raise our children in ranching and has continuously taught them life lessons tied to agriculture.

Who inspires you or serves as a mentor? My mentors were my grandmothers and their quiet strength in their family operations. These women never complained about hardships, but relied on their faith and competence in difficult times. They found joy in ranch and farm life.

How do you provide encouragement to others? I hope a daily positive attitude is evident to others. I hope I truly listen to others and respond with care and concern.

If given the chance, what message about agriculture or the beef industry would you share with a large group of people? The necessity of family ranches. We have many people comment on the work ethic of our children, which we can directly tie to working with cattle and the land. These ideas are antiquated in modern culture, but are still recognized as positive. I would hope to share that ranching is a “serving” industry; our mission is to feed a growing hungry world and we do that by the ranch values of caring for others and our livestock. It goes back to living The Golden Rule.

What are you most thankful for?  A life lived with family, cattle and land.

What is your favorite meal to cook yourself or for others? An old Idaho CowBelles recipe, Chinese Whisky Steak. I usually add a side Sides of ranch potatoes, Rosemary Rolls (from The Pioneer Woman), green salad and Texas Sheet Cake for dessert! Wins them over every time!

What is the first thing you do when you walk into a grocery store? Look at my list!

What is your favorite childhood memory? Helping feed the sale bulls in our old barn. All the rations were hand-mixed and bunk fed as we halter-broke the bulls to come to the bunk.  You learned to judge their temperaments and gain their trust. Those hours around the bulls taught me to “read” cattle. Not paying attention garnished a few bruises from being kicked!  The radio was always on KSRV and everything had to be quiet when the market report came on!

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What are some of your favorite pastimes and/or hobbies?  I love college football! My favorite season is fall, so we can watch the race to the championship. I love all kinds of music—Big Band, Dean Martin, Classical, Irish, Red Dirt, Classic Country and George Strait, so an hour at the piano with no interruptions and all my music books is a treat!

Be sure to connect with Julie on Facebook!

Categories: Beef, Blogging, Idaho Cattlewomen, Lifestyle, Ranch Life

Change and Thankfulness

Every rancher we know has a plan—that outlined picture of what the future holds. Some people have it typed and saved on a hard drive, others pencil it out on paper-—or scribble it on a napkin—and yet others sketch their plans in their mind map. Whatever the case, we are all aware of what we’d like the future to look like. If we are really honest, we often have two plans—the practical plan and the “whoa, I’m dreaming big, baby!” plan. Usually we file the first and tuck away the second in our underwear drawer so no one will see our outlandish thoughts.

Recently, something happened in our own little world that defied both plans and made us stop and think: “What do we do with this?”

It isn’t on the plan—not even the wild plan. It feels like it’ll really make things better or spiral us toward the polar opposite.

Will it be like the time I lost my rope or saved a calf?

Gathering the girls

Gathering the girls

 

Often things come into our lives that we aren’t sure what to do with—and somehow our uncertainty seems to make us think we’ve failed. There should always be a plan, whether it is the normal one or the big one, right? Plans have always helped us, but they just can’t always be concrete. Life is bound to change; surprises happen. Sometimes it isn’t exactly a cut and dry answer that’s needed (Unless it can be fixed with duct tape or baling twine), as much as it is a process.

One year we were surprised with twins—a red one and a black one!

One year we were surprised with twins—a red one and a black one!

Truly ranching is a process and one that I’m thankful for regularly. As we celebrated Thanksgiving this week, thankfulness is on my mind. I love how producers help each other and share information. I treasure how friendships can be formed easily. I’m thankful for fresh air and animals. I’m grateful that even though plans change or get flipped upside down, we still have ranching. I’m thankful for everyday ideas and “Whoa, baby” big plans—and for the people in my life who appreciate both. As producers, we have a lot to be thankful for—both in industry standards and in each other. Here’s to dreaming big and flexible plans!

I am thankful for cows!

I am thankful for cows!

~ Marci

Marci is a city girl gone country. She married her cowboy and never looked back. While life may be different than what she first imagined, it’s also better than she expected as well. She and her husband are raising their three kids on the ranch, and she has grown used to all the boots by the door.

Categories: Blogging, Idaho Cattlewomen, Ranch Life