Category: Idaho Cattlewomen

2021 Scholarship Applications

The 2021 Scholarship Applications are available now. To qualify, students must have parents/grandparents or guardians as members of ICA, and be pursuing a degree in agriculture or ag-related field.

2021 ICW Scholarship Application

2021 Simplot Scholarship Application

Categories: Idaho Cattlewomen, Scholarship

2020 Scholarship Saddle Tickets on Sale

Purchase your tickets online through PayPal (don’t need account, just pay with CC) or call the ICA office at 208-343-1615. Thanks for your continued support of our scholarship program!

 

Categories: Idaho Cattlewomen, Scholarship

Meet an Idaho Cattlewoman ~ Valene Lickley

How are you involved in agriculture today?
I am currently an agricultural engineer for AGPROfessionals focusing on drainage, engineering and permitting for Confined Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) all across the western United States. I love assisting owners and operators with achieving their goals and keeping production animal agriculture alive.

Outside of the office and as a passion project, I am a co-host for the Millennial Ag Podcast. Bringing the perspective, hot topics, and real life stories of agriculture to the public through the lens of millennials.

And when I have free time, I spend it riding my horse and assisting my family on their cow-calf operation.

How has your life been shaped by agriculture?
Agriculture is deep in my veins and it has and will always be a large part of my heart. When I graduated high school, I knew I wanted to be involved in agriculture and work towards making a difference in my community. I ended up pursuing a degree in Civil Engineering and continued to stay involved in agriculture in a variety of ways. During that time, I always thought that the agriculture community was who could influence me the most. While this is true and I have a lot of people to thank, I had a very closed mind. I ended up being influenced a lot by people outside the agriculture community and those who helped me understand the other 98% of the world who eats, wears and uses the products we produce.

Who inspires you or serves as a mentor?
My family, and specifically my parents, Bill and Laurie. They have always worked humbly and hard to be involved in their communities and take a lot of pride in their work. I am so blessed and grateful to have role models that answer my silly questions and guide me in life, the cattle markets and my career.

How do you provide encouragement to others?
In the last six months, I have co-hosted the Millennial Ag Podcast with my good friend Katharine Lotspeich. Through the podcast we talk about real issues, real stories and allow Millennial Agagriculture to be vulnerable with the consumers and themselves. We try and tackle the real hot topic issues but we always try and leave everyone with a positive thought, idea or action item. We want to give hope to agriculture and allow agriculture to begin to have those tough conversations that we have been avoiding for years.
Our podcast can be found on any major podcast platform (Apple, Google, Spotify, Podbean, etc.) or at millennialag.com.

If given the chance, what message about agriculture or the beef industry would you share with a large group of people?
Dare to be different and Dare to take a chance! As a fifth generational rancher, I never imagined I would ever rock climb, run long distances or hike tall mountains. I also never thought I was capable of starting a podcast or leading a team of professionals at 25. Once I shook off the control and tunnel vision of the life I thought I should be living, the opportunities and connections I made were better than I could ever imagine. Life is not going to be easy. We are going to fall flat on our face, but we have to have faith, work hard and stay true to our roots while opening our eyes to the possibilities.

What are you most thankful for?
I am grateful for my faith, my community (family and friends) and adventure!

What is your favorite meal to cook yourself or for others?
You cannot really beat a good T-bone steak, sweet potatoes and a fresh veggie. Easy, tasty and nutritious!

Valene (center) with her parents, Bill and Laurie, participated in the Race for the Steaks to benefit Beef Counts and the Treasure Valley YMCA.

What is your favorite childhood memory?
One of my favorite childhood memories was getting a group of friends together and catching all our “broke” horses to play football on bareback. When we would get bored playing football, we would run them through the pivot sprinklers and jump the pivot tracks. How we didn’t fall off or get bucked off more times than we did is still a mystery to me.

What are a few of your guilty pleasures?
Wine or a cold beer (depending on the time of year) and lots of laughs with friends and family!

Where is your favorite place to shop?
My Mom’s closet… My mom loves clothes, has better style than I do,   and her rule is that anything that comes into her closet, something has to go out. So it is a win-win situation.

Categories: Blogging, Idaho Cattlewomen, Lifestyle

Idaho Beef Council Resources

The Idaho Beef Council has several resources for learning more about cooking with beef, as well as sharing the ranching families who are helping raise beef in our state. Check these out and share with others.

Website:  www.IDBeef.org

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/IdahoBeefCouncil/

Pinterest:  https://www.pinterest.com/idbeef/

Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/idahobeefcouncil/

YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClS31C2XTtpisQsT5YGfAow

Categories: Beef, Cattle, Idaho Cattlewomen, Lifestyle, Ranch kids, Ranch Life, Recipes

Meet an Idaho Cattlewoman: Gwenna Prescott

Gwenna and Wade Prescott.

The Prescotts-Wade, Gus, Gwenna (with Agnes), Christie and Wyatt (holding Virgil)

As the new Cattlewoman Chair for the Idaho Cattle Association, I am humbled to serve our state cattle industry and feel we all have a very important story to share with modern day consumers who want to understand how their food is grown. Furthermore, we all share a sense of responsibility to do our part in ensuring the future of our states cattle industry. Now is my turn. I have never known a life outside of agriculture. I was born and raised on a row crop and livestock farm and married a cowboy, from which we have made a living and life ranching and feeding cattle.

In my kitchen, hangs a sign that reads, “Behind every successful rancher is a wife that works in town.” It is a sign that rings true in our life. I have always worked in banking and the success of this job in town to our operation has not been as much about the off-ranch income, as it has been about the off-ranch skills. While I have never personally thought of my role in the operation as critical, it is and the role of women in agriculture is and always has been. My career in banking also enabled me to keep tight books and understand balance sheets, budgets, and capital access that enabled us to start and restart on occasion in this industry and bring along children with cattle as well.

Above and beyond, like many others, I’ve spent a lifetime shifting gears from my bank clothes after work to driving silage truck or sorting calves, then getting dinner on the table. Oh, then making sure the boys had lunch for the next day or else they won’t eat, to balancing the checkbook after bedtime, to waking up the next morning before daylight to help load a truck all before going to my job in town. I am not alone. Many of us do this day in and day out just to keep living this lifestyle in a business whose real purpose is to put food on the table for the world.

At times, in the day-to-day challenges, it’s easy to lose perspective of what we are really creating. I don’t know how my husband and son can work twelve hours straight and only say twelve words to each other, yet know exactly what the other is thinking or asking. I don’t know how the words “in” and “bye” can sound so similar, or how I am ever supposed to know exactly which black cow to get out when I am told to get the black cow over there. I don’t know why every time we work cattle it always takes twice as long as they say it will, yet they never adjust how long they say it will take or why cattle are always out on holidays and birthdays, but it just seems to happen this way. I’ve said on many occasions that maybe we ought to sell the whole damn thing.

There was a time where I encouraged my boys to pursue careers outside of agriculture. Those have always been fleeting moments, not only because I have some strange addiction to having cattle around or that I believe that producing beef for people far and wide is truly a noble and rewarding occupation. For me, this business and lifestyle also has another self-serving amenity. There is no better way to raise a family.

It is family that makes serving as Cattlewomen Chair truly rewarding. It is families like the Kerners, who epitomize this family fabric that means so much to me in this cattle world. The Cattlewomen are honored to partner with them this year for the Julie Rae Kerner Memorial Scholarship. The scholarships that the Cattlewomen are able to help provide are important to me. Having raised two boys with cattle and knowing my grandbabies will be raised the same way leaves me with sense of peace that not much else could. In one way or another cattle paid for my kids’ education, and it’s important the Cattlewomen and ICA help another family and young producer in this way. Thanks to our annual saddle raffle and partners we were able to give four $1,000 scholarships’ last year. Invest in our cattle kids, and support the Cattlewomen.

Categories: Idaho Cattlewomen, Ranch Life, Scholarship