Category: Recipes

Slow Cooker Mongolian Beef: Year of Beef

Woohooo! Our first Year of Beef recipe in what seems like forever! Unfortunately, the past couple weeks around here have been a bit crazy, so cooking and writing got put on the back burner (see what I did there?). For the first few days of last week, I was in Boise for board meetings with ICA. They always say “if you don’t use it, ya lose it”, and boy are they right. After three years of not being in an office, sitting in one spot for that long was quite the challenge. I’m pretty sure all my board member counterparts probably refer to me as “Squirmy Sally”! I also spent the three following days in Reno, for the AgChat Foundation’s Western Regional Agvocacy Conference. This is the fourth time I’ve been to an AgChat event, and I definitely recommend all my fellow agriculture friends attend a future event.

As much as I loved getting dressed up every day (something that doesn’t happen much on the ranch), and getting involved in some of my industry’s most important aspects, it sure does feel good to be home. I’m now officially back in the saddle, and ready to whip up some delicious recipes! This week’s recipe was emailed to me by fellow Idaho Cattlewoman, Trish. She and her family ranch in Ellis, Idaho—you might remember seeing her featured as one of our Women in Ag—last November.

During my time in Reno, a fellow planning committee member gave me a box of California-grown products, which included a bag of Lundberg Family Farms Brown Basmati Rice. No Mongolian meal is complete without rice, so I figured this would be the perfect opportunity to try it out.

Ingredients:

2 1/2 lbs. Brisket, Round Steak, or Flank Steak

¼ c. Cornstarch

1 Tbs. minced garlic

1 Tbs. ground ginger

3/4 c. brown sugar

3/4 c. soy sauce

3/4 c. water

2 Tbs. Siracha sauce

2 Tbs. olive oil

Directions:

Raw-Brisket-Whole-Map-3First things first, take your meat and slice it thinly, across the grain. Don’t know what that is? Meat is made up of long muscle fibers that are laid out parallel to one another. In some muscles, like the loin (think New York strip steak, Ribeye, etc.), that grain is very fine. Meaning, the muscle fiber bundles are thin enough that they don’t form a significant grain. Cuts from these muscles are going to be very tender, no matter how you slice them.

Cuts from harder-working muscles (think about the Brisket or Round areas from the diagram) are going to have thicker muscle fiber bundles, with a noticeable grain. If you slice WITH the grain, you’ll end up with pieces of meat that are difficult to chew, aka not tender. But if you slice against the grain, you’ll be breaking those muscle fibers into smaller sections, which helps to add that tender aspect we all love. In the Brisket I used, you can see just how visible these muscle fiber bundles are.Beef Brisket

Next you’re going to put your meat in a gallon-sized bag, add the ¼ c. cornstarch and shake until the meat is covered. You can set aside this bag aside while you add the rest of the ingredients into your slow cooker. Once you’ve got everything in, finish off by adding your meat.Mongolian Beef

Your cooking options are setting your slow cooker on High for 2-3 hours, or setting it on Low for 5-6 hours. As mentioned earlier, I paired this meal with a side of rice; a move that I definitely recommend! I actually added about two tablespoons of my slow cooker mixture to my water/rice combo before cooking, and it really helped to give it that extra little bit of flavor.

This shot was my “before”…crockpot

And here’s my after!

finshedproduct

Categories: Beef, Idaho Cattlewomen, Recipes

Dinner for Two: Year of Beef

Ahhhhh, the weekend of love. While Valentine’s Day is my least favorite holiday (for the sheer reason that it often gets people feeling left out), I still feel inclined to celebrate with my fellow cattlewomen!

Originally I was planning on cooking up a “V Day Filet” this week, specifically for those of us who would rather spend the evening at home, or don’t have the time to make reservations somewhere. As it turns out, I couldn’t even reserve a day to make this meal in my own home…every time I attempted we either had a heifer calving or had plans that required sack lunches. Case in point on why reservations don’t really work for us Jarvis’!

Instead, I’m going to throw it back to a few of my favorite ICW recipes, cooked by none other than the wonderful Maggie Malson. This Grilled Skirt Steak is a super easy recipe that can be paired with a variety of sides! And if your “sweetie” isn’t sweet enough, I suggest making this Rustic Shortbread Apple Pie for dessert. It’s sure to brighten the day of whoever might be the apple of your eye.

PicMonkey Collage

Happy Valentine’s Day weekend, from our ranch to yours!

Categories: Beef, Recipes

Steak Bruschetta: Year of Beef

I know this week’s Year of Beef installment was supposed to feature a Blade Roast, but in honor of Sunday’s big game I decided to switch things up a bit. I’ll be saving the roast for a later date, and turning this week’s focus on my ALL TIME favorite beef appetizer, the Steak Bruschetta! The first time I had these was last year at an Idaho Cattlewoman meeting, and I’ve been in love ever since. Megan Satterwhite (Idaho Cattlewoman President) brought these to Sun Valley, and they were a hit! So good, in fact, that a month later I made these and took them to my parent’s house on Christmas Eve!

The original recipe calls for Flank Steak, but if you notice my pictures, that’s not what I used. Unfortunately I couldn’t get one thawed out in time, so I took the liberty of heading to the meat case of our local grocery store. beefdiagramThere wasn’t any Flank Steak available, but there was a great selection of Carne Asada. Carne Asada is a thin beef steak that’s usually cut from a flank, skirt or flap steak, which is why I felt confident in my choice. Flank steak comes from the Flank area, Skirt comes from the Plate area, and Flap comes from the Bottom Sirloin. As you can see, all of those cuts come from close to the same abdominal area, which is why they’re pretty interchangeable in this recipe.

I hope you all have a great Super Bowl Sunday, may the best team win!

Ingredients: (Hang tight on measurements, I’ll go into detail on those in just a bit!)

Flank Steak

Baguette

Onion

Blue Cheese (slices are easiest, but crumbles work just fine)

Measurements: I suggest making these based on sheet quantity. One baking sheet worth, two baking sheets worth…you get the picture! I used an 18”x13” baking sheet, and could have easily fit 25 bruschetta bites on my sheet, without being too crowded (and I had the makings for that many as well). I used 1 pound of Carne Asada, ½ of an extra-long baguette, and one entire large onion. One block of blue cheese would easily cover your bruschetta bites, and leave you with extra as well. On Christmas Eve we made one sheet worth of bruschetta (along with other appetizers) for four people, and didn’t have any leftover—so you can use that as your scale for however many you think you’ll need.

Options: The options/substitutions on this recipe are almost endless. As mentioned above, Flank Steak, Carne Asada, Skirt Steak or Flap Steak are all similar, and can be utilized in this recipe. The original recipe calls for blue cheese; however, Mr. Jarvis isn’t a very big BC fan, so instead I put Feta on his. Gorgonzola would also work, as would thinly sliced smoked Gouda. I’m an onion lover, but I know there are those out there who aren’t. Although my heart breaks at the thought of no onion, taking it away would still leave you with a flavor-full bruschetta bite (and you’ll notice I also made a row of those for Mr. J). If you’re cooking for a crowd and are unsure of their preferences, I’d go ahead and make a row of each—that way nobody gets left out!

Directions: Now, on to the fun part! First, I sliced my onions and started sautéing those up until they were tender.onions_steakbruschetta I also took this time to line my baking sheet with tin foil, making for easy clean up! While the onions cooking, I turned the Traeger up to high, and waited for it to heat up. My onions were done as soon as it was time to put the meat on, which worked out perfectly. While the meat cooked, I got busy slicing up my baguette into pieces approximately ½ inch thick. My favorite baguettes come from the Costco bakery, and can usually be found next to the bagels.

carneasada_steakbruschettaI cooked my meat for about 3 minutes per side. Personally, I don’t like to get my meat too done, because I know it’ll cook even more after everything is assembled and in the oven. After my meat was cooked enough to be considered as rare, I brought it inside and sliced it into 1-2” sections, or whatever size will fit nicely on your baguette.

The assembly for these bites is unbelievably easy!

Step 1) Grab a slice of baguette;

Step 2) Grab a slice of meat, and add that to your baguette slice;

Step 3) Top steak with cheese;

Step 4) Add onion, and set the bite on your baking sheet!

_steakbruschettaThese go in a 350 degree oven for about 10-15 minutes, or until the cheese is melted. (If you’re going to use Feta, be aware that it’s not going to melt like blue cheese does…so 10 minutes should work just fine.) This recipe is perfect if you like making stuff ahead of time (or the night before), that way all you have to do is assemble the parts and throw your pan(s) into the oven. I hope you enjoy!

And now for a little extra fun…the winners of our “Make Mine Beef” giveaway are:MakeMineBeefWinnerYou can send us an email (info(at)idahocattlewomen(dot)org) to claim your prize!

Categories: Beef, Idaho Cattlewomen, Recipes

Four Bean Hamburger Chili: A Year of Beef

Hey there, and welcome to the third installment of our Year of Beef series!

I was planning on making this chili for lunch, but that didn’t end up happening how I had envisioned it. After breakfast I went up to the ranch to finish our year-end books, thinking it wouldn’t take long and I’d be home in time to throw everything in the Crockpot for a couple of hours. But books turned into hauling off dead limbs, and dead limbs turned into calving out a heifer. Justin and I ended up getting home at 11:55, which left me with just enough time to throw some things in the microwave before Noon. 

Aren’t these just the cutest calves you’ve ever seen? So far we’ve had one bull and one heifer, and have been blessed with such great mommas.

Aren’t these just the cutest calves you’ve ever seen? So far we’ve had one bull and one heifer, and have been blessed with such great mommas.

Right after lunch I started working on this chili. It didn’t take me too long to throw it all together, and get back to doing things on the ranch!

Ingredients:

1.5 lbs. ground hamburger (browned and drained)

1 can Kidney Beans

1 can Pinto Beans

1 can Black Beans

1 can Great Northern Beans

1 can corn

1 small/medium yellow onion (chopped)

1 small/medium red onion (chopped)

¼ cup barbecue sauce

¼ cup Frank’s Buffalo sauce

¼ cup Worcestershire sauce

Pepper, Cumin, and Chili Powder to taste

Beef Broth (optional)

cookedgroundFirst, I went through the process of browning my hamburger. We had our butcher grind everything pretty lean, which made for very little fat to drain off. I’m a big time proponent of lean beef—nothing can compare to its protein-packed flavor!

While the hamburger was browning, I dumped all four cans of beans into a strainer, draining and rinsing them prior to putting them into the slow cooker.fourcolorbeans

I also chopped up both onions, and added them in; along with the barbeque sauce, Worcestershire sauce, and Frank’s Buffalo Sauce. After the hamburger was browned (about 7-10 minutes), I added it to the pot, closed the lid, and set it to cook on low for 3 hours. Whenever I’d get a chance to come inside I’d open the lid and stir things around, just to make sure everything got mixed in.

Here’s my reasoning as to why I consider the beef broth to be optional. Personally, I prefer my chili to be thick and hearty. As the combination of beef, beans, corn and sauce cooks, you’ll notice that a good amount of liquid starts to make itself known (as you can see in the picture below). After it’s stirred in, the mixture creates the perfect blend of chili—not too thick, but not too runny. That being said, there are people who prefer chili to be more in the form of a soup. If you’re one of those individuals, I suggest adding in one can of beef broth, to give the mixture a little bit of added moisture as it cooks.finished product

It was a beautiful day, so while this was cooking I went up and helped the guys with our afternoon feeding. Because of that, I didn’t get a chance to make cornbread like I promised—but I’ll be sure to add it to another recipe down the road. My cornbread probably wouldn’t have had a very big dent in it, because there was a good 15 minutes where Justin and I dipped our chili straight out of the Crock-Pot with some tortilla chips. Not sanitary, I know.

When it was actually time for dinner, I threw my scoop of chili in with a little fat free cheddar cheese and some of my favorite Quest-brand barbecue chips, to give it a little extra flavor. For all you little health nuts out there (myself included)…this recipe is the perfect blend of fat, carbohydrates, and protein; making it a balanced meal that’ll not only fuel your body, but keep you full for a long period of time.

Next week I’m cooking up a Blade Roast—so if you’ve got any delicious recipes, be sure to send them our way! And if you haven’t heard, we’re giving away two of these fun “Make Mine Beef” caps, so don’t forget to subscribe to our posts for a chance to win!

makeminebeef

Categories: Beef, Blogging, Recipes

Rib Steak: A Year of Beef

Welcome to the second installment of our Year of Beef series! We had a lot of great feedback from last week’s recipe, which we were all really excited to hear!

Beef Diagram; RibThis week we’re going to grill up a couple of absolutely beautiful rib steaks! This delicious cut is located at the top of the rib primal portion of the beef (highlighted in yellow) and generally comes from the section of beef spanning from ribs six through twelve.

So what’s the difference between a Rib Steak and Prime Rib? Not a whole lot! When combined as a multiple Rib Roast section and roasted, it’s considered to be Prime Rib; but when each one section is sliced and then grilled, it becomes a bone-in rib steak.

This marinade recipe comes from the kitchen of my pal Tamzy Hopwood, who submitted it after last week’s O Bone Roast recipe! Tamzy is quite the cook, so I had no doubt what she was sending me would turn out phenomenal!

The last few day’s we’ve been busy moving different sets of expectant mother cows into their new “nursery” fields. It’s been windy, wet and cold—so the last thing I want to do after being out all day is come home and cook some extravagant meal. A recipe like this works perfect for our current schedule, because all I have to do when I get home is turn on the Traeger, and whip up some kind of side to go with it. And did I mention there are hardly any dishes to do?! Now that’s what I call winning!!

Rib Steak; Beef

Ingredients:

1/3 cup low-sodium soy sauce

1/4 cup olive oil

1/3 cup fresh lemon juice

¼ cup Worcestershire sauce

1 ½ tsp garlic powder

3 Tb dried basil

1 ½ Tb dried parsley flakes

1 tsp course sea salt (if desired, not necessary)

Add all ingredients into a gallon-sized Ziplock bag. Add steaks to marinade mixture, refrigerating at least 8 hours, prior to cooking.

Since I knew I would be busy making lunches in the morning, I started marinating these the night before—which gave them almost 24 hours to immerse themselves into this mixture, prior to grilling.

Rib Steak; BeefI fired up our Traeger on high, and cooked each steak for 8 minutes per side. I decided to keep our meal pretty simple, so in between flipping steaks I whipped up a homemade Caesar salad and a few slices of garlic bread.

Rib Steak; Justin JarvisJustin claimed this was the best steak I’ve ever cooked, so I think we can officially consider this recipe to be a success! At first I thought he was just trying to be nice, but after I had a chance to dig into mine, I have no doubts his words were somewhat close to the truth.

Next week I’m planning on making up a pot of hamburger chili and cornbread, along with a fun little giveaway, so be sure to stop by!

Categories: Beef, Blogging, Idaho Cattlewomen, Recipes